Install this theme

Posts tagged: NASA



RS-25 rocket engine No. 0525 is positioned onto the A-1 Test Stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi in preparation for a series of developmental tests.



Image Credit: 

NASA
RS-25 rocket engine No. 0525 is positioned onto the A-1 Test Stand at NASA’s Stennis Space Center in Mississippi in preparation for a series of developmental tests.
Image Credit: 
NASA

NASA’s Mars rover Curiosity has photographed Mercury crossing the face of the sun, marking the first time such a planetary “transit” has ever been imaged from the surface of a planet other than Earth.

The Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine, CECE for short, based on the design of the heritage Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne RL10 engine, has completed its third round of intensive testing. This technology development engine is fueled by a mixture of minus 297F liquid oxygen and minus 423F liquid hydrogen. The engine components are super-cooled to similar low temperatures. As the CECE burns its frigid fuels, gas composed of hot steam is produced and propelled out the nozzle creating thrust. This high speed, hot gas mixture is essential for propulsion. The steam is cooled by the cold engine nozzle, condensing and eventually freezing at the nozzle exit to form icicles

The Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine, CECE for short, based on the design of the heritage Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne RL10 engine, has completed its third round of intensive testing. This technology development engine is fueled by a mixture of minus 297F liquid oxygen and minus 423F liquid hydrogen. The engine components are super-cooled to similar low temperatures. As the CECE burns its frigid fuels, gas composed of hot steam is produced and propelled out the nozzle creating thrust. This high speed, hot gas mixture is essential for propulsion. The steam is cooled by the cold engine nozzle, condensing and eventually freezing at the nozzle exit to form icicles

The RS-25 engine that will power NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), off the launch pad and on journeys to an asteroid and Mars is getting ready for the test stand. And it is packing a big punch.
Engineers at NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss., are now focusing their attention on preparing the RS-25 engine after completing testing of the J-2X engine April 10. Four RS-25 engines, previously known as space shuttle main engines, will muscle the core stage of SLS for each of its missions. Towering more than 200 feet tall with a diameter of 27.6 feet, the core stage will store cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the vehicle’s RS-25s.

The RS-25 engine that will power NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System (SLS), off the launch pad and on journeys to an asteroid and Mars is getting ready for the test stand. And it is packing a big punch.

Engineers at NASA’s Stennis Space Center near Bay St. Louis, Miss., are now focusing their attention on preparing the RS-25 engine after completing testing of the J-2X engine April 10. Four RS-25 engines, previously known as space shuttle main engines, will muscle the core stage of SLS for each of its missions. Towering more than 200 feet tall with a diameter of 27.6 feet, the core stage will store cryogenic liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen that will feed the vehicle’s RS-25s.

after a successful Mission Critical Design Review (CDR) for NASA’s Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx). The CDR was held at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company in Littleton, Colo., April 1-9. An independent review board, comprised of experts from NASA and several external organizations, met to review the system design.
"This is the final step for a NASA mission to go from paper to product,” said Gordon Johnston, OSIRIS-REx program executive at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. “This confirms that the final design is ready to start the build-up towards launch.”

after a successful Mission Critical Design Review (CDR) for NASA’s Origins Spectral Interpretation Resource Identification Security Regolith Explorer (OSIRIS-REx). The CDR was held at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company in Littleton, Colo., April 1-9. An independent review board, comprised of experts from NASA and several external organizations, met to review the system design.

"This is the final step for a NASA mission to go from paper to product,” said Gordon Johnston, OSIRIS-REx program executive at NASA Headquarters, Washington, DC. “This confirms that the final design is ready to start the build-up towards launch.”

Film taken includes Earth views and nice views of the Saturn 1B launch vehicle S-4B stage after separation from the Command and Service Module (CSM) and during station keeping. Also includes Walter Cunningham donning his pressure suit, an Earth limb sunset view, and Walter Schirra, Donn Eisele, and Cunningham in the Command and Service Module (CSM). From Apollo 08, includes various full Earth views, views of lunar surface taken during lunar orbit, and Frank Borman, James Lovell, and William Anders inside Command Module (CM).


At 5:17 p.m. EDT Tuesday (3:17 a.m. local time, Wednesday), a Soyuz rocket launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, sending two Russian cosmonauts and a NASA astronaut on a fast-track ride to the International Space Station.
However, just as the Russian-built rocket ascended into space, NASA astronaut and Expedition 38/Expedition 39 flight engineer Rick Mastracchio managed to zoom in on the nighttime Kazakh launch site and photograph the bright flames of the Soyuz from orbit.
Mastracchio, who has been living on the orbiting outpost since November, tweeted the photo only minutes after launch, writing: “Just saw the Soyuz launch from station. Great view. In 6 hours we will have new crew members.”
The Soyuz spacecraft is carrying NASA’s Steve Swanson and cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev who are scheduled to join Mastracchio and the rest of the crew at 11:05 p.m. EDT tonight.
—-That’s just dope all around

At 5:17 p.m. EDT Tuesday (3:17 a.m. local time, Wednesday), a Soyuz rocket launched from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, sending two Russian cosmonauts and a NASA astronaut on a fast-track ride to the International Space Station.

However, just as the Russian-built rocket ascended into space, NASA astronaut and Expedition 38/Expedition 39 flight engineer Rick Mastracchio managed to zoom in on the nighttime Kazakh launch site and photograph the bright flames of the Soyuz from orbit.

Mastracchio, who has been living on the orbiting outpost since November, tweeted the photo only minutes after launch, writing: “Just saw the Soyuz launch from station. Great view. In 6 hours we will have new crew members.”

The Soyuz spacecraft is carrying NASA’s Steve Swanson and cosmonauts Alexander Skvortsov and Oleg Artemyev who are scheduled to join Mastracchio and the rest of the crew at 11:05 p.m. EDT tonight.

—-That’s just dope all around

Math Models Make F-18 into Space Launch System

Engineers at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center talk about the new flight control system for the agency’s Space Launch System. When completed, the rocket will be the largest, most powerful launch vehicle to support deep space missions. (NASA/MSFC)