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humanoidhistory:

Polaris missile launch on July 20, 1960. (Stellar Views)

humanoidhistory:

Polaris missile launch on July 20, 1960. (Stellar Views)

rocketman-inc:

Danish Airforce: Saab 35 Darken

rocketman-inc:

Danish Airforce: Saab 35 Darken

broadcastarchive-umd:

Sansui RA-700 Reverberation Amplifier, 1970s.
ggdave:

I had one of these. Great reverb and spatial separation.  Plus it just looked cool!

broadcastarchive-umd:

Sansui RA-700 Reverberation Amplifier, 1970s.

ggdave:

I had one of these. Great reverb and spatial separation.  Plus it just looked cool!
space-pics:

Falcon 9 v1.1 from ignition to 1st stage MECO, seen at night over Kennedy Space Centerhttp://space-pics.tumblr.com/

space-pics:

Falcon 9 v1.1 from ignition to 1st stage MECO, seen at night over Kennedy Space Center
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

centreforaviation:

DC-130 assigned to Fleet Composite Squadron 3 (VC-3) carrying two BQM-34S Firebee target drones. July, 1975.

centreforaviation:

DC-130 assigned to Fleet Composite Squadron 3 (VC-3) carrying two BQM-34S Firebee target drones. July, 1975.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In the transonic speed regime the overall speed of an airplane is less than Mach 1 but some parts of the flow around the aircraft break the speed of sound. The photo above shows a schlieren photograph of flow over an airfoil at transonic speeds. The nearly vertical lines are shock waves on the upper and lower surfaces of the airfoil. Although the freestream speed in the tunnel is less than Mach 1 upstream of the airfoil, air accelerates over the curved surface of airfoil and locally exceeds the speed of sound. When that supersonic flow cannot be sustained, a shock wave occurs; flow to the right of the shock wave is once again subsonic. It’s also worth noting the bright white turbulent flow along the upper surface of the airfoil after the shock. This is the boundary layer, which can often separate from the wing in transonic flows, causing a marked increase in drag and decrease in lift. Most commercial airliners operate at transonic Mach numbers and their geometry is specifically designed to mitigate some of the challenges of this speed regime.  (Image credit: NASA; via D. Baals and W. Corliss)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In the transonic speed regime the overall speed of an airplane is less than Mach 1 but some parts of the flow around the aircraft break the speed of sound. The photo above shows a schlieren photograph of flow over an airfoil at transonic speeds. The nearly vertical lines are shock waves on the upper and lower surfaces of the airfoil. Although the freestream speed in the tunnel is less than Mach 1 upstream of the airfoil, air accelerates over the curved surface of airfoil and locally exceeds the speed of sound. When that supersonic flow cannot be sustained, a shock wave occurs; flow to the right of the shock wave is once again subsonic. It’s also worth noting the bright white turbulent flow along the upper surface of the airfoil after the shock. This is the boundary layer, which can often separate from the wing in transonic flows, causing a marked increase in drag and decrease in lift. Most commercial airliners operate at transonic Mach numbers and their geometry is specifically designed to mitigate some of the challenges of this speed regime.  (Image credit: NASA; via D. Baals and W. Corliss)

To commemorate the home video release of GODZILLA; I made an update to the classic animated film; Bambi meets Godzilla.  dig if you will

You can make your own here

laboratoryequipment:

Skintight Spacesuits Offer More Movement, FreedomFor future astronauts, the process of suiting up may go something like this: instead of climbing into a conventional, bulky, gas-pressurized suit, an astronaut may don a lightweight, stretchy garment, lined with tiny, muscle-like coils. She would then plug in to a spacecraft’s power supply, triggering the coils to contract and essentially shrink-wrap the garment around her body.The skintight, pressurized suit would not only support the astronaut, but would give her much more freedom to move during planetary exploration. To take the suit off, she would only have to apply modest force, returning the suit to its looser form.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/skintight-spacesuits-offer-more-movement-freedom

laboratoryequipment:

Skintight Spacesuits Offer More Movement, Freedom

For future astronauts, the process of suiting up may go something like this: instead of climbing into a conventional, bulky, gas-pressurized suit, an astronaut may don a lightweight, stretchy garment, lined with tiny, muscle-like coils. She would then plug in to a spacecraft’s power supply, triggering the coils to contract and essentially shrink-wrap the garment around her body.

The skintight, pressurized suit would not only support the astronaut, but would give her much more freedom to move during planetary exploration. To take the suit off, she would only have to apply modest force, returning the suit to its looser form.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/09/skintight-spacesuits-offer-more-movement-freedom